Friday, July 31, 2009

Liati Wote

I have finally seen my site! I hiked Mt. Afadjato, which was quite a hike. My legs still hurt! I visited the chief, and he gave me some local gin, called Apateshi. It's tradition to take a shot at special occasions, and to pour some out on the floor for the ancestors. After seeing the chief, my counterpart and I went to Tagbo Falls with a tourist group from Germany and Accra. We were sweating like crazy, because the alcohol, and the other tourists must have thought we were crazy, because the walk is not difficult at all.

My house is amazing, I have a bookcase, bed, and desk already. And I have access to the kitchen, which I found to be great after two months of not eating American food. Believe it or not, I really enjoyed cooking for myself this past week. You have to remember, I have had no say in the meals prepared for me in Maase. I figured out how to make onion rings, stir-fry, and one-pot-pasta.

I'm very excited to finally move in, the people are very friendly, and I am already getting excited about working on developing the tourism.

11 comments:

meremortal said...

Awesome Katie !

Glad to hear you're adjusting to the local quisine.

Stephanie said...

All of your blogs sound so awesome! What an incredible experience. There better be pictures to go along with these stories...or else...

Susan C said...

I agree with Stephanie about the pictures. You simply MUST upload some soon! (Even with the "sketchy" internet connection.) Plus, I'm dying to see your face! We miss you like crazy!

Love,
Mom

Theresa Mattiello said...

Hey! Awesome posts! Who is your counterpart? Are they from Ghana or another PC volunteer? That's cool that they will be like your guide and help you continue to adapt! Love you!

Katie Caldwell said...

My counterpart is from Liati Wote. Her name is Dora, and shes really cool. Her English is amazing. :)

Jerry Hilgenberg said...

I can't speculate on the gin, but be careful of that local beer that they brew in big barrels and drink from straws. It is wicked evil!

During their days of Empire, The English liked to partake of a drink commonly known to us as the "Sundowner". It's a gin and tonic. The tonic in Africa has quinine and is helpful in fighting off malaria. Swirl the gin in the glass first --- all the way to the rim --- to kill the germs!

Jerry Hilgenberg said...

Tell us about some of the business names.

Jerry H said...

Sorry, I meant to leave the above comment with the malaria post!

Anonymous said...

Hey I am sorry I haven't had a chance to read until I got to school! I am so glad that you are having a good time and finding something to eat! I agree with Mom and Stephanie about some pictures. I would love to see these touristy attractions! I love and miss you- Jennifer

Megan said...

Katie, your blog is so exciting to read (especially from little ol' Greensboro, which seems increasingly boring as I keep reading). I would also love to see some pictures...of the area or your house...anything. And you need to send me your address so I can send you a copy of the new Avett Brothers album. I just got hired for my first real job, so I'll be able to afford to send it to you soon. Geez, Katie...I love you and I miss you and I wish you were in Greensboro so we could go together to see Holy Ghost tonight at the Blind Tiger.

Katie Caldwell said...

OMG! HGTR?!?! AWwww, see gso doesnt completely suck! <3 Katie